1: /* m_getfld.c - read/parse a message */
   2: 
   3: #include "../h/mh.h"
   4: #include <stdio.h>
   5: #include "../zotnet/mts.h"
   6: #include <ctype.h>
   7: 
   8: 
   9: /* This module has a long and checkered history.  First, it didn't burst
  10:    maildrops correctly because it considered two CTRL-A:s in a row to be
  11:    an inter-message delimiter.  It really is four CTRL-A:s followed by a
  12:    newline.  Unfortunately, MMDF will convert this delimiter *inside* a
  13:    message to a CTRL-B followed by three CTRL-A:s and a newline.  This
  14:    caused the old version of m_getfld() to declare eom prematurely.  The
  15:    fix was a lot slower than
  16: 
  17: 		c == '\001' && peekc (iob) == '\001'
  18: 
  19:    but it worked, and to increase generality, UUCP style maildrops could
  20:    be parsed as well.  Unfortunately the speed issue finally caught up with
  21:    us since this routine is at the very heart of MH.
  22: 
  23:    To speed things up considerably, the routine Eom() was made an auxilary
  24:    function called by the macro eom().  Unless we are bursting a maildrop,
  25:    the eom() macro returns FALSE saying we aren't at the end of the
  26:    message.
  27: 
  28:    The next thing to do is to read the mtstailor file and initialize
  29:    delimiter[] and delimlen accordingly...
  30: 
  31:    After mhl was made a built-in in msh, m_getfld() worked just fine
  32:    (using m_unknown() at startup).  Until one day: a message which was
  33:    the result of a bursting was shown. Then, since the burst boundaries
  34:    aren't CTRL-A:s, m_getfld() would blinding plunge on past the boundary.
  35:    Very sad.  The solution: introduce m_eomsbr().  This hook gets called
  36:    after the end of each line (since testing for eom involves an fseek()).
  37:    This worked fine, until one day: a message with no body portion arrived.
  38:    Then the
  39: 
  40: 		   while (eom (c = Getc (iob), iob))
  41: 			continue;
  42: 
  43:    loop caused m_getfld() to return FMTERR.  So, that logic was changed to
  44:    check for (*eom_action) and act accordingly.
  45: 
  46:    This worked fine, until one day: someone didn't use four CTRL:A's as
  47:    their delimiters.  So, the bullet got bit and we read mts.h and
  48:    continue to struggle on.  It's not that bad though, since the only time
  49:    the code gets executed is when inc (or msh) calls it, and both of these
  50:    have already called mts_init().
  51: 
  52:    ------------------------
  53:    (Written by Van Jacobson for the mh6 m_getfld, January, 1986):
  54: 
  55:    This routine was accounting for 60% of the cpu time used by most mh
  56:    programs.  I spent a bit of time tuning and it now accounts for <10%
  57:    of the time used.  Like any heavily tuned routine, it's a bit
  58:    complex and you want to be sure you understand everything that it's
  59:    doing before you start hacking on it.  Let me try to emphasize
  60:    that:  every line in this atrocity depends on every other line,
  61:    sometimes in subtle ways.  You should understand it all, in detail,
  62:    before trying to change any part.  If you do change it, test the
  63:    result thoroughly (I use a hand-constructed test file that exercises
  64:    all the ways a header name, header body, header continuation,
  65:    header-body separator, body line and body eom can align themselves
  66:    with respect to a buffer boundary).  "Minor" bugs in this routine
  67:    result in garbaged or lost mail.
  68: 
  69:    If you hack on this and slow it down, I, my children and my
  70:    children's children will curse you.
  71: 
  72:    This routine gets used on three different types of files: normal,
  73:    single msg files, "packed" unix or mmdf mailboxs (when used by inc)
  74:    and packed, directoried bulletin board files (when used by msh).
  75:    The biggest impact of different file types is in "eom" testing.  The
  76:    code has been carefully organized to test for eom at appropriate
  77:    times and at no other times (since the check is quite expensive).
  78:    I have tried to arrange things so that the eom check need only be
  79:    done on entry to this routine.  Since an eom can only occur after a
  80:    newline, this is easy to manage for header fields.  For the msg
  81:    body, we try to efficiently search the input buffer to see if
  82:    contains the eom delimiter.  If it does, we take up to the
  83:    delimiter, otherwise we take everything in the buffer.  (The change
  84:    to the body eom/copy processing produced the most noticeable
  85:    performance difference, particularly for "inc" and "show".)
  86: 
  87:    There are three qualitatively different things this routine busts
  88:    out of a message: field names, field text and msg bodies.  Field
  89:    names are typically short (~8 char) and the loop that extracts them
  90:    might terminate on a colon, newline or max width.  I considered
  91:    using a Vax "scanc" to locate the end of the field followed by a
  92:    "bcopy" but the routine call overhead on a Vax is too large for this
  93:    to work on short names.  If Berkeley ever makes "inline" part of the
  94:    C optimiser (so things like "scanc" turn into inline instructions) a
  95:    change here would be worthwhile.
  96: 
  97:    Field text is typically 60 - 100 characters so there's (barely)
  98:    a win in doing a routine call to something that does a "locc"
  99:    followed by a "bmove".  About 30% of the fields have continuations
 100:    (usually the 822 "received:" lines) and each continuation generates
 101:    another routine call.  "Inline" would be a big win here, as well.
 102: 
 103:    Messages, as of this writing, seem to come in two flavors: small
 104:    (~1K) and long (>2K).  Most messages have 400 - 600 bytes of headers
 105:    so message bodies average at least a few hundred characters.
 106:    Assuming your system uses reasonably sized stdio buffers (1K or
 107:    more), this routine should be able to remove the body in large
 108:    (>500 byte) chunks.  The makes the cost of a call to "bcopy"
 109:    small but there is a premium on checking for the eom in packed
 110:    maildrops.  The eom pattern is always a simple string so we can
 111:    construct an efficient pattern matcher for it (e.g., a Vax "matchc"
 112:    instruction).  Some thought went into recognizing the start of
 113:    an eom that has been split across two buffers.
 114: 
 115:    This routine wants to deal with large chunks of data so, rather
 116:    than "getc" into a local buffer, it uses stdio's buffer.  If
 117:    you try to use it on a non-buffered file, you'll get what you
 118:    deserve.  This routine "knows" that struct FILEs have a _ptr
 119:    and a _cnt to describe the current state of the buffer and
 120:    it knows that _filbuf ignores the _ptr & _cnt and simply fills
 121:    the buffer.  If stdio on your system doesn't work this way, you
 122:    may have to make small changes in this routine.
 123: 
 124:    This routine also "knows" that an EOF indication on a stream is
 125:    "sticky" (i.e., you will keep getting EOF until you reposition the
 126:    stream).  If your system doesn't work this way it is broken and you
 127:    should complain to the vendor.  As a consequence of the sticky
 128:    EOF, this routine will never return any kind of EOF status when
 129:    there is data in "name" or "buf").
 130:   */
 131: 
 132: 
 133: #define Getc(iob)   getc(iob)
 134: #define eom(c,iob)  (msg_style != MS_DEFAULT && \
 135:              (((c) == *msg_delim && m_Eom(c,iob)) ||\
 136:               (eom_action && (*eom_action)(c))))
 137: 
 138: static char *matchc();
 139: static char *locc();
 140: 
 141: static char **pat_map;
 142: 
 143: int msg_count = 0;  /* disgusting hack for "inc" so it can
 144: 			 * know how many characters were stuffed
 145: 			 * in the buffer on the last call (see
 146: 			 * comments in uip/scansbr.c) */
 147: 
 148: int msg_style = MS_DEFAULT;
 149: /*
 150:  * The "full" delimiter string for a packed maildrop consists
 151:  * of a newline followed by the actual delimiter.  E.g., the
 152:  * full string for a Unix maildrop would be: "\n\nFrom ".
 153:  * "Fdelim" points to the start of the full string and is used
 154:  * in the BODY case of the main routine to search the buffer for
 155:  * a possible eom.  Msg_delim points to the first character of
 156:  * the actual delim. string (i.e., fdelim+1).  Edelim
 157:  * points to the 2nd character of actual delimiter string.  It
 158:  * is used in m_Eom because the first character of the string
 159:  * has been read and matched before m_Eom is called.
 160:  */
 161: char    *msg_delim = "";
 162: static char *fdelim;
 163: static char *delimend;
 164: static int  fdelimlen;
 165: static char *edelim;
 166: static int  edelimlen;
 167: 
 168: static int  (*eom_action) () = NULL;
 169: 
 170: /*  */
 171: 
 172: m_getfld (state, name, buf, bufsz, iob)
 173: int     state;
 174: int     bufsz;
 175: char        *name,
 176:         *buf;
 177: register FILE   *iob;
 178: {
 179:     register char  *cp;
 180:     register char  *bp;
 181:     register int    cnt;
 182:     register int    c;
 183:     register int    i;
 184:     register int    j;
 185:     register char  *ep;
 186:     register char  *sp;
 187: 
 188:     if ((c = Getc(iob)) < 0) {
 189:     msg_count = 0;
 190:     *buf = 0;
 191:     return FILEEOF;
 192:     }
 193:     if (eom (c, iob)) {
 194:     if (! eom_action) {
 195:         /* flush null messages */
 196:         while ((c = Getc(iob)) >= 0 && eom (c, iob))
 197:         ;
 198:         if (c >= 0)
 199:         (void) ungetc(c, iob);
 200:     }
 201:     msg_count = 0;
 202:     *buf = 0;
 203:     return FILEEOF;
 204:     }
 205: 
 206:     switch (state) {
 207:     case FLDEOF:
 208:     case BODYEOF:
 209:     case FLD:
 210:         if (c == '\n' || c == '-') {
 211:         /* we hit the header/body separator */
 212:         while (c != '\n' && (c = Getc(iob)) >= 0)
 213:             ;
 214: 
 215:         if (c < 0 || (c = Getc(iob)) < 0 || eom (c, iob)) {
 216:             if (! eom_action) {
 217:             /* flush null messages */
 218:             while ((c = Getc(iob)) >= 0 && eom (c, iob))
 219:                 ;
 220:             if (c >= 0)
 221:                 (void) ungetc(c, iob);
 222:             }
 223:             msg_count = 0;
 224:             *buf = 0;
 225:             return FILEEOF;
 226:         }
 227:         state = BODY;
 228:         goto body;
 229:         }
 230:         /*
 231: 	     * get the name of this component.  take characters up
 232: 	     * to a ':', a newline or NAMESZ-1 characters, whichever
 233: 	     * comes first.
 234: 	     */
 235:         cp = name; i = NAMESZ - 1;
 236:         for (;;) {
 237:         bp = sp = iob->_ptr - 1;
 238:         j = (cnt = iob->_cnt+1) < i ? cnt : i;
 239:         while ((c = *bp++) != ':' && c != '\n' && --j >= 0)
 240:             *cp++ = c;
 241: 
 242:         j = bp - sp;
 243:         if ((cnt -= j) <= 0) {
 244:             if (_filbuf(iob) == EOF) {
 245:             *cp = *buf = NULL;
 246:             advise (NULLCP, "eof encountered in field \"%s\"",
 247:                 name);
 248:             return FMTERR;
 249:             }
 250:         } else {
 251:             iob->_ptr = bp + 1;
 252:             iob->_cnt = cnt - 1;
 253:         }
 254:         if (c == ':')
 255:             break;
 256: 
 257:         /*
 258: 		 * something went wrong.  possibilities are:
 259: 		 *  . hit a newline (error)
 260: 		 *  . got more than namesz chars. (error)
 261: 		 *  . hit the end of the buffer. (loop)
 262: 		 */
 263:         if (c == '\n') {
 264:             *cp = *buf = NULL;
 265:             advise (NULLCP, "eol encountered in field \"%s\"", name);
 266:             state = FMTERR;
 267:             goto finish;
 268:         }
 269:         if ((i -= j) <= 0) {
 270:             *cp = *buf = NULL;
 271:             advise (NULLCP, "field name \"%s\" exceeds %d bytes",
 272:                 name, NAMESZ - 1);
 273:             state = LENERR;
 274:             goto finish;
 275:         }
 276:         }
 277: 
 278:         while (isspace (*--cp) && cp >= name)
 279:         ;
 280:         *++cp = NULL;
 281:         /* fall through */
 282: 
 283:     case FLDPLUS:
 284:         /*
 285: 	     * get (more of) the text of a field.  take
 286: 	     * characters up to the end of this field (newline
 287: 	     * followed by non-blank) or bufsz-1 characters.
 288: 	     */
 289:         cp = buf; i = bufsz-1;
 290:         for (;;) {
 291:         cnt = iob->_cnt++; bp = --iob->_ptr;
 292:         c = cnt < i ? cnt : i;
 293:         while (ep = locc( c, bp, '\n' )) {
 294:             /*
 295: 		     * if we hit the end of this field, return.
 296: 		     */
 297:             if ((j = *++ep) != ' ' && j != '\t') {
 298:             j = ep - iob->_ptr;
 299:             (void) bcopy( iob->_ptr, cp, j);
 300:             iob->_ptr = ep; iob->_cnt -= j;
 301:             cp += j;
 302:             state = FLD;
 303:             goto finish;
 304:             }
 305:             c -= ep - bp; bp = ep;
 306:         }
 307:         /*
 308: 		 * end of input or dest buffer - copy what we've found.
 309: 		 */
 310:         c += bp - iob->_ptr;
 311:         (void) bcopy( iob->_ptr, cp, c);
 312:         i -= c; cp += c;
 313:         if (i <= 0) {
 314:             /* the dest buffer is full */
 315:             iob->_cnt -= c; iob->_ptr += c;
 316:             state = FLDPLUS;
 317:             break;
 318:         }
 319:         /*
 320: 		 * There's one character left in the input buffer.
 321: 		 * Copy it & fill the buffer.  If the last char
 322: 		 * was a newline and the next char is not whitespace,
 323: 		 * this is the end of the field.  Otherwise loop.
 324: 		 */
 325:         --i;
 326:         *cp++ = j = *(iob->_ptr + c);
 327:         c = _filbuf(iob);
 328:         if (j == '\n' && c != ' ' && c != '\t') {
 329:             if (c != EOF)
 330:             --iob->_ptr, ++iob->_cnt;
 331:             state = FLD;
 332:             break;
 333:         }
 334:         }
 335:         break;
 336: 
 337:     case BODY:
 338:     body:
 339:         /*
 340: 	     * get the message body up to bufsz characters or the
 341: 	     * end of the message.  Sleazy hack: if bufsz is negative
 342: 	     * we assume that we were called to copy directly into
 343: 	     * the output buffer and we don't add an eos.
 344: 	     */
 345:         i = (bufsz < 0) ? -bufsz : bufsz-1;
 346:         bp = --iob->_ptr; cnt = ++iob->_cnt;
 347:         c = (cnt < i ? cnt : i);
 348:         if (msg_style != MS_DEFAULT && c > 1) {
 349:         /*
 350: 		 * packed maildrop - only take up to the (possible)
 351: 		 * start of the next message.  This "matchc" should
 352: 		 * probably be a Boyer-Moore matcher for non-vaxen,
 353: 		 * particularly since we have the alignment table
 354: 		 * all built for the end-of-buffer test (next).
 355: 		 * But our vax timings indicate that the "matchc"
 356: 		 * instruction is 50% faster than a carefully coded
 357: 		 * B.M. matcher for most strings.  (So much for elegant
 358: 		 * algorithms vs. brute force.)  Since I (currently)
 359: 		 * run MH on a vax, we use the matchc instruction. --vj
 360: 		 */
 361:         if (ep = matchc( fdelimlen, fdelim, c, bp ) )
 362:             c = ep - bp + 1;
 363:         else {
 364:             /*
 365: 		     * There's no delim in the buffer but there may be
 366: 		     * a partial one at the end.  If so, we want to leave
 367: 		     * it so the "eom" check on the next call picks it up.
 368: 		     * Use a modified Boyer-Moore matcher to make this
 369: 		     * check relatively cheap.  The first "while" figures
 370: 		     * out what position in the pattern matches the last
 371: 		     * character in the buffer.  The inner "while" matches
 372: 		     * the pattern against the buffer, backwards starting
 373: 		     * at that position.  Note that unless the buffer
 374: 		     * ends with one of the characters in the pattern
 375: 		     * (excluding the first and last), we do only one test.
 376: 		     */
 377:             sp = delimend;
 378:             ep = bp + c - 1;
 379:             while ((cp = pat_map[*ep]) < sp) {
 380:             ep = bp + c - 1; sp = cp;
 381:             while (*--ep == *--cp && cp > fdelim)
 382:                 ;
 383:             if (cp == fdelim) {
 384:                 if (*ep == *cp && ep > bp)
 385:                 c = (ep - bp) + 1;
 386:                 break;
 387:             }
 388:             }
 389:         }
 390:         }
 391:         (void) bcopy( bp, buf, c );
 392:         iob->_cnt -= c;
 393:         iob->_ptr += c;
 394:         if (bufsz < 0) {
 395:         msg_count = c;
 396:         return (state);
 397:         }
 398:         cp = buf + c;
 399:         break;
 400: 
 401:     default:
 402:         adios (NULLCP, "m_getfld() called with bogus state of %d", state);
 403:     }
 404: finish:;
 405:     *cp = NULL;
 406:     msg_count = cp - buf;
 407:     return (state);
 408: }
 409: 
 410: /*  */
 411: 
 412: #ifdef  RPATHS
 413: static char  unixbuf[BUFSIZ] = "";
 414: #endif	RPATHS
 415: 
 416: void m_unknown (iob)
 417: register FILE *iob;
 418: {
 419:     register    int c;
 420:     register    long pos;
 421:     char    text[10];
 422:     register    char *cp;
 423: 
 424:     msg_style = MS_UNKNOWN;
 425: 
 426:     /* Figure out what the message delimitter string is for this
 427:      * maildrop.  (This used to be part of m_Eom but I didn't like
 428:      * the idea of an "if" statement that could only succeed on the
 429:      * first call to m_Eom getting executed on each call, i.e., at
 430:      * every newline in the message).
 431:      *
 432:      * If the first line of the maildrop is a Unix "from" line, we say the
 433:      * style is UUCP and eat the rest of the line.  Otherwise we say the style
 434:      * is MMDF & look for the delimiter string specified when MH was built
 435:      * (or from the mtstailor file).
 436:      */
 437:     pos = ftell (iob);
 438:     if (fread (text, sizeof *text, 5, iob) == 5
 439:         && strncmp (text, "From ", 5) == 0) {
 440:     msg_style = MS_UUCP;
 441:     fdelim = "\n\nFrom ";
 442: #ifndef RPATHS
 443:     while ((c = getc (iob)) != '\n' && c >= 0)
 444:         ;
 445: #else   RPATHS
 446:     cp = unixbuf;
 447:     while ((c = getc (iob)) != '\n')
 448:         *cp++ = c;
 449:     *cp = NULL;
 450: #endif	RPATHS
 451:     } else {
 452:     /* not a Unix style maildrop */
 453:     (void) fseek (iob, pos, 0);
 454:     if (mmdlm2 == NULLCP || *mmdlm2 == NULL)
 455:         mmdlm2 = "\001\001\001\001\n";
 456:     fdelim = (char *)malloc((unsigned)strlen(mmdlm2)+2);
 457:     *fdelim = '\n';
 458:     (void)strcpy(fdelim+1, mmdlm2);
 459:     msg_style = MS_MMDF;
 460:     }
 461:     fdelimlen = strlen(fdelim);
 462:     msg_delim = fdelim+1;
 463:     edelim = msg_delim+1;
 464:     edelimlen = fdelimlen-2;
 465:     delimend = msg_delim + edelimlen;
 466:     if (edelimlen <= 1)
 467:     adios (NULLCP, "maildrop delimiter must be at least 2 bytes");
 468:     /*
 469:      * build a Boyer-Moore end-position map for the matcher in m_getfld.
 470:      * N.B. - we don't match just the first char (since it's the newline
 471:      * separator) or the last char (since the matchc would have found it
 472:      * if it was a real delim).
 473:      */
 474:     pat_map = (char **) malloc( 256 * sizeof (char *));
 475:     for (c = 256; c--; )
 476:     pat_map[c] = delimend + 1;
 477: 
 478:     for (cp = fdelim + 1; cp < delimend; cp++ )
 479:     pat_map[*cp] = cp;
 480: 
 481:     if (msg_style == MS_MMDF) {
 482:     /* flush extra msg hdrs */
 483:     while ((c = Getc(iob)) >= 0 && eom (c, iob))
 484:         ;
 485:     if (c >= 0)
 486:         (void) ungetc(c, iob);
 487:     }
 488: }
 489: 
 490: 
 491: void m_eomsbr (action)
 492: int     (*action) ();
 493: {
 494:     if (eom_action = action) {
 495:     msg_style = MS_MSH;
 496:     *msg_delim = 0;
 497:     fdelimlen = 1;
 498:     delimend = fdelim;
 499:     } else {
 500:     msg_style = MS_MMDF;
 501:     msg_delim = fdelim + 1;
 502:     fdelimlen = strlen (fdelim);
 503:     delimend = msg_delim + edelimlen;
 504:     }
 505: }
 506: 
 507: /*  */
 508: 
 509: /* test for msg delimiter string */
 510: 
 511: int  m_Eom (c, iob)
 512: register int     c;
 513: register FILE   *iob;
 514: {
 515:     register long pos = 0L;
 516:     register int i;
 517:     char    text[10];
 518: #ifdef  RPATHS
 519:     register    char *cp;
 520: #endif	RPATHS
 521: 
 522:     pos = ftell (iob);
 523:     if ((i = fread (text, sizeof *text, edelimlen, iob)) != edelimlen
 524:         || strncmp (text, edelim, edelimlen)) {
 525:     if (i == 0 && msg_style == MS_UUCP)
 526:         /* the final newline in the (brain damaged) unix-format
 527: 	     * maildrop is part of the delimitter - delete it.
 528: 	     */
 529:         return 1;
 530: 
 531:     (void) fseek (iob, pos, 0);
 532:     return 0;
 533:     }
 534: 
 535:     if (msg_style == MS_UUCP) {
 536: #ifndef RPATHS
 537:     while ((c = getc (iob)) != '\n')
 538:         if (c < 0)
 539:         break;
 540: #else   RPATHS
 541:     cp = unixbuf;
 542:     while ((c = getc (iob)) != '\n' && c >= 0)
 543:         *cp++ = c;
 544:     *cp = NULL;
 545: #endif	RPATHS
 546:     }
 547: 
 548:     return 1;
 549: }
 550: 
 551: /*  */
 552: 
 553: #ifdef  RPATHS
 554: char   *unixline () {
 555:     register char  *cp,
 556:                    *dp,
 557:                    *pp;
 558:     static char unixfrom[BUFSIZ];
 559: 
 560:     pp = unixfrom;
 561:     if (cp = dp = index (unixbuf, ' ')) {
 562:     while (cp = index (cp + 1, 'r'))
 563:         if (strncmp (cp, "remote from ", 12) == 0) {
 564:         *cp = NULL;
 565:         (void) sprintf (pp, "%s!", cp + 12);
 566:         pp += strlen (pp);
 567:         break;
 568:         }
 569:     if (cp == NULL)
 570:         cp = unixbuf + strlen (unixbuf);
 571:     if ((cp -= 25) >= dp)
 572:         *cp = NULL;
 573:     }
 574: 
 575:     (void) sprintf (pp, "%s\n", unixbuf);
 576:     unixbuf[0] = NULL;
 577:     return unixfrom;
 578: }
 579: #endif	RPATHS
 580: 
 581: /*  */
 582: 
 583: #if (vax && !lint)
 584:     asm(".align 1");
 585:     asm("_matchc: .word 0");
 586:     asm("	movq 4(ap),r0");
 587:     asm("	movq 12(ap),r2");
 588:     asm("	matchc  r0,(r1),r2,(r3)");
 589:     asm("	beql 1f");
 590:     asm("	movl 4(ap),r3");
 591:     asm("1:	subl3  4(ap),r3,r0");
 592:     asm("	ret");
 593: #else
 594: static char *
 595: matchc( patln, pat, strln, str )
 596:     int patln;
 597:     char *pat;
 598:     int strln;
 599:     register char *str;
 600: {
 601:     register char *es = str + strln - patln;
 602:     register char *sp;
 603:     register char *pp;
 604:     register char *ep = pat + patln;
 605:     register char pc = *pat++;
 606: 
 607:     for(;;) {
 608:         while (pc != *str++)
 609:             if (str > es)
 610:                 return 0;
 611: 
 612:         sp = str; pp = pat;
 613:         while (pp < ep && *sp++ == *pp++)
 614:             ;
 615:         if (pp >= ep)
 616:             return (--str);
 617:     }
 618: }
 619: #endif
 620: 
 621: /*  */
 622: 
 623: /*
 624:  * Locate character "term" in the next "cnt" characters of "src".
 625:  * If found, return its address, otherwise return 0.
 626:  */
 627: #if (vax && !lint)
 628:     asm(".align 1");
 629:     asm("_locc: .word 0");
 630:     asm("	movq  4(ap),r0");
 631:     asm("	locc  12(ap),r0,(r1)");
 632:     asm("	beql  1f");
 633:     asm("	movl  r1,r0");
 634:     asm("1:	ret");
 635: #else
 636: static char *
 637: locc( cnt, src, term )
 638:     register int  cnt;
 639:     register char *src;
 640:     register char term;
 641: {
 642:     while (*src++ != term && --cnt > 0);
 643: 
 644:     return (cnt > 0 ? --src : NULLCP);
 645: }
 646: #endif
 647: 
 648: /*  */
 649: 
 650: #if !defined (BSD42) && !defined (bcopy)
 651: int bcmp (b1, b2, length)
 652: register char *b1,
 653:           *b2;
 654: register int   length;
 655: {
 656:     while (length-- > 0)
 657:     if (*b1++ != *b2++)
 658:         return 1;
 659: 
 660:     return 0;
 661: }
 662: 
 663: 
 664: bcopy (b1, b2, length)
 665: register char *b1,
 666:           *b2;
 667: register int   length;
 668: {
 669:     while (length-- > 0)
 670:     *b2++ = *b1++;
 671: }
 672: 
 673: 
 674: bzero (b, length)
 675: register char *b;
 676: register int   length;
 677: {
 678:     while (length-- > 0)
 679:     *b++ = NULL;
 680: }
 681: #endif	not BSD42 or SYS5

Defined functions

bcmp defined in line 651; never used
bcopy defined in line 664; never used
bzero defined in line 674; never used
locc defined in line 636; used 2 times
m_Eom defined in line 511; used 1 times
m_eomsbr defined in line 491; never used
m_getfld defined in line 172; used 3 times
m_unknown defined in line 416; never used
matchc defined in line 594; used 2 times
unixline defined in line 554; never used

Defined variables

delimend defined in line 163; used 6 times
edelim defined in line 165; used 2 times
edelimlen defined in line 166; used 7 times
fdelim defined in line 162; used 13 times
fdelimlen defined in line 164; used 5 times
msg_count defined in line 143; used 5 times
msg_delim defined in line 161; used 7 times
msg_style defined in line 148; used 10 times
pat_map defined in line 141; used 4 times
unixbuf defined in line 413; used 7 times

Defined macros

Getc defined in line 133; used 6 times
eom defined in line 134; used 5 times
Last modified: 1986-05-13
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