1: /*
   2:  * machdep.c
   3:  *
   4:  * This source herein may be modified and/or distributed by anybody who
   5:  * so desires, with the following restrictions:
   6:  *    1.)  No portion of this notice shall be removed.
   7:  *    2.)  Credit shall not be taken for the creation of this source.
   8:  *    3.)  This code is not to be traded, sold, or used for personal
   9:  *         gain or profit.
  10:  *
  11:  */
  12: 
  13: #ifndef lint
  14: static char sccsid[] = "@(#)machdep.c	5.2 (Berkeley) 11/25/87";
  15: #endif /* not lint */
  16: 
  17: /* Included in this file are all system dependent routines.  Extensive use
  18:  * of #ifdef's will be used to compile the appropriate code on each system:
  19:  *
  20:  *    UNIX:        all UNIX systems.
  21:  *    UNIX_BSD4_2: UNIX BSD 4.2 and later, UTEK, (4.1 BSD too?)
  22:  *    UNIX_SYSV:   UNIX system V
  23:  *    UNIX_V7:     UNIX version 7
  24:  *
  25:  * All UNIX code should be included between the single "#ifdef UNIX" at the
  26:  * top of this file, and the "#endif" at the bottom.
  27:  *
  28:  * To change a routine to include a new UNIX system, simply #ifdef the
  29:  * existing routine, as in the following example:
  30:  *
  31:  *   To make a routine compatible with UNIX system 5, change the first
  32:  *   function to the second:
  33:  *
  34:  *      md_function()
  35:  *      {
  36:  *         code;
  37:  *      }
  38:  *
  39:  *      md_function()
  40:  *      {
  41:  *      #ifdef UNIX_SYSV
  42:  *         sys5code;
  43:  *      #else
  44:  *         code;
  45:  *      #endif
  46:  *      }
  47:  *
  48:  * Appropriate variations of this are of course acceptible.
  49:  * The use of "#elseif" is discouraged because of non-portability.
  50:  * If the correct #define doesn't exist, "UNIX_SYSV" in this case, make it up
  51:  * and insert it in the list at the top of the file.  Alter the CFLAGS
  52:  * in you Makefile appropriately.
  53:  *
  54:  */
  55: 
  56: #ifdef UNIX
  57: 
  58: #include <stdio.h>
  59: #include <sys/types.h>
  60: #include <sys/file.h>
  61: #include <sys/stat.h>
  62: #include <pwd.h>
  63: 
  64: #ifdef UNIX_BSD4_2
  65: #include <sys/time.h>
  66: #include <sgtty.h>
  67: #endif
  68: 
  69: #ifdef UNIX_SYSV
  70: #include <time.h>
  71: #include <termio.h>
  72: #endif
  73: 
  74: #include <signal.h>
  75: #include "rogue.h"
  76: 
  77: /* md_slurp:
  78:  *
  79:  * This routine throws away all keyboard input that has not
  80:  * yet been read.  It is used to get rid of input that the user may have
  81:  * typed-ahead.
  82:  *
  83:  * This function is not necessary, so it may be stubbed.  The might cause
  84:  * message-line output to flash by because the game has continued to read
  85:  * input without waiting for the user to read the message.  Not such a
  86:  * big deal.
  87:  */
  88: 
  89: md_slurp()
  90: {
  91:     long ln = 0;
  92: 
  93: #ifdef UNIX_BSD4_2
  94:     ioctl(0, FIONREAD, &ln);
  95: #endif
  96: #ifdef UNIX_SYSV
  97:     ioctl(0, TCFLSH, &ln);
  98:     ln = 0;
  99: #endif
 100: 
 101:     ln += stdin->_cnt;
 102: 
 103:     for (; ln > 0; ln--) {
 104:         (void) getchar();
 105:     }
 106: }
 107: 
 108: /* md_control_keyboard():
 109:  *
 110:  * This routine is much like md_cbreak_no_echo_nonl() below.  It sets up the
 111:  * keyboard for appropriate input.  Specifically, it prevents the tty driver
 112:  * from stealing characters.  For example, ^Y is needed as a command
 113:  * character, but the tty driver intercepts it for another purpose.  Any
 114:  * such behavior should be stopped.  This routine could be avoided if
 115:  * we used RAW mode instead of CBREAK.  But RAW mode does not allow the
 116:  * generation of keyboard signals, which the program uses.
 117:  *
 118:  * The parameter 'mode' when true, indicates that the keyboard should
 119:  * be set up to play rogue.  When false, it should be restored if
 120:  * necessary.
 121:  *
 122:  * This routine is not strictly necessary and may be stubbed.  This may
 123:  * cause certain command characters to be unavailable.
 124:  */
 125: 
 126: md_control_keybord(mode)
 127: boolean mode;
 128: {
 129:     static boolean called_before = 0;
 130: #ifdef UNIX_BSD4_2
 131:     static struct ltchars ltc_orig;
 132:     static struct tchars tc_orig;
 133:     struct ltchars ltc_temp;
 134:     struct tchars tc_temp;
 135: #endif
 136: #ifdef UNIX_SYSV
 137:     static struct termio _oldtty;
 138:     struct termio _tty;
 139: #endif
 140: 
 141:     if (!called_before) {
 142:         called_before = 1;
 143: #ifdef UNIX_BSD4_2
 144:         ioctl(0, TIOCGETC, &tc_orig);
 145:         ioctl(0, TIOCGLTC, &ltc_orig);
 146: #endif
 147: #ifdef UNIX_SYSV
 148:         ioctl(0, TCGETA, &_oldtty);
 149: #endif
 150:     }
 151: #ifdef UNIX_BSD4_2
 152:     ltc_temp = ltc_orig;
 153:     tc_temp = tc_orig;
 154: #endif
 155: #ifdef UNIX_SYSV
 156:     _tty = _oldtty;
 157: #endif
 158: 
 159:     if (!mode) {
 160: #ifdef UNIX_BSD4_2
 161:         ltc_temp.t_suspc = ltc_temp.t_dsuspc = -1;
 162:         ltc_temp.t_rprntc = ltc_temp.t_flushc = -1;
 163:         ltc_temp.t_werasc = ltc_temp.t_lnextc = -1;
 164:         tc_temp.t_startc = tc_temp.t_stopc = -1;
 165: #endif
 166: #ifdef UNIX_SYSV
 167:         _tty.c_cc[VSWTCH] = CNSWTCH;
 168: #endif
 169:     }
 170: #ifdef UNIX_BSD4_2
 171:     ioctl(0, TIOCSETC, &tc_temp);
 172:     ioctl(0, TIOCSLTC, &ltc_temp);
 173: #endif
 174: #ifdef UNIX_SYSV
 175:     ioctl(0, TCSETA, &_tty);
 176: #endif
 177: }
 178: 
 179: /* md_heed_signals():
 180:  *
 181:  * This routine tells the program to call particular routines when
 182:  * certain interrupts/events occur:
 183:  *
 184:  *      SIGINT: call onintr() to interrupt fight with monster or long rest.
 185:  *      SIGQUIT: call byebye() to check for game termination.
 186:  *      SIGHUP: call error_save() to save game when terminal hangs up.
 187:  *
 188:  *		On VMS, SIGINT and SIGQUIT correspond to ^C and ^Y.
 189:  *
 190:  * This routine is not strictly necessary and can be stubbed.  This will
 191:  * mean that the game cannot be interrupted properly with keyboard
 192:  * input, this is not usually critical.
 193:  */
 194: 
 195: md_heed_signals()
 196: {
 197:     signal(SIGINT, onintr);
 198:     signal(SIGQUIT, byebye);
 199:     signal(SIGHUP, error_save);
 200: }
 201: 
 202: /* md_ignore_signals():
 203:  *
 204:  * This routine tells the program to completely ignore the events mentioned
 205:  * in md_heed_signals() above.  The event handlers will later be turned on
 206:  * by a future call to md_heed_signals(), so md_heed_signals() and
 207:  * md_ignore_signals() need to work together.
 208:  *
 209:  * This function should be implemented or the user risks interrupting
 210:  * critical sections of code, which could cause score file, or saved-game
 211:  * file, corruption.
 212:  */
 213: 
 214: md_ignore_signals()
 215: {
 216:     signal(SIGQUIT, SIG_IGN);
 217:     signal(SIGINT, SIG_IGN);
 218:     signal(SIGHUP, SIG_IGN);
 219: }
 220: 
 221: /* md_get_file_id():
 222:  *
 223:  * This function returns an integer that uniquely identifies the specified
 224:  * file.  It need not check for the file's existence.  In UNIX, the inode
 225:  * number is used.
 226:  *
 227:  * This function is used to identify saved-game files.
 228:  */
 229: 
 230: int
 231: md_get_file_id(fname)
 232: char *fname;
 233: {
 234:     struct stat sbuf;
 235: 
 236:     if (stat(fname, &sbuf)) {
 237:         return(-1);
 238:     }
 239:     return((int) sbuf.st_ino);
 240: }
 241: 
 242: /* md_link_count():
 243:  *
 244:  * This routine returns the number of hard links to the specified file.
 245:  *
 246:  * This function is not strictly necessary.  On systems without hard links
 247:  * this routine can be stubbed by just returning 1.
 248:  */
 249: 
 250: int
 251: md_link_count(fname)
 252: char *fname;
 253: {
 254:     struct stat sbuf;
 255: 
 256:     stat(fname, &sbuf);
 257:     return((int) sbuf.st_nlink);
 258: }
 259: 
 260: /* md_gct(): (Get Current Time)
 261:  *
 262:  * This function returns the current year, month(1-12), day(1-31), hour(0-23),
 263:  * minute(0-59), and second(0-59).  This is used for identifying the time
 264:  * at which a game is saved.
 265:  *
 266:  * This function is not strictly necessary.  It can be stubbed by returning
 267:  * zeros instead of the correct year, month, etc.  If your operating
 268:  * system doesn't provide all of the time units requested here, then you
 269:  * can provide only those that it does, and return zeros for the others.
 270:  * If you cannot provide good time values, then users may be able to copy
 271:  * saved-game files and play them.
 272:  */
 273: 
 274: md_gct(rt_buf)
 275: struct rogue_time *rt_buf;
 276: {
 277:     struct tm *t, *localtime();
 278:     long seconds;
 279: 
 280:     time(&seconds);
 281:     t = localtime(&seconds);
 282: 
 283:     rt_buf->year = t->tm_year;
 284:     rt_buf->month = t->tm_mon + 1;
 285:     rt_buf->day = t->tm_mday;
 286:     rt_buf->hour = t->tm_hour;
 287:     rt_buf->minute = t->tm_min;
 288:     rt_buf->second = t->tm_sec;
 289: }
 290: 
 291: /* md_gfmt: (Get File Modification Time)
 292:  *
 293:  * This routine returns a file's date of last modification in the same format
 294:  * as md_gct() above.
 295:  *
 296:  * This function is not strictly necessary.  It is used to see if saved-game
 297:  * files have been modified since they were saved.  If you have stubbed the
 298:  * routine md_gct() above by returning constant values, then you may do
 299:  * exactly the same here.
 300:  * Or if md_gct() is implemented correctly, but your system does not provide
 301:  * file modification dates, you may return some date far in the past so
 302:  * that the program will never know that a saved-game file being modified.
 303:  * You may also do this if you wish to be able to restore games from
 304:  * saved-games that have been modified.
 305:  */
 306: 
 307: md_gfmt(fname, rt_buf)
 308: char *fname;
 309: struct rogue_time *rt_buf;
 310: {
 311:     struct stat sbuf;
 312:     long seconds;
 313:     struct tm *t;
 314: 
 315:     stat(fname, &sbuf);
 316:     seconds = (long) sbuf.st_mtime;
 317:     t = localtime(&seconds);
 318: 
 319:     rt_buf->year = t->tm_year;
 320:     rt_buf->month = t->tm_mon + 1;
 321:     rt_buf->day = t->tm_mday;
 322:     rt_buf->hour = t->tm_hour;
 323:     rt_buf->minute = t->tm_min;
 324:     rt_buf->second = t->tm_sec;
 325: }
 326: 
 327: /* md_df: (Delete File)
 328:  *
 329:  * This function deletes the specified file, and returns true (1) if the
 330:  * operation was successful.  This is used to delete saved-game files
 331:  * after restoring games from them.
 332:  *
 333:  * Again, this function is not strictly necessary, and can be stubbed
 334:  * by simply returning 1.  In this case, saved-game files will not be
 335:  * deleted and can be replayed.
 336:  */
 337: 
 338: boolean
 339: md_df(fname)
 340: char *fname;
 341: {
 342:     if (unlink(fname)) {
 343:         return(0);
 344:     }
 345:     return(1);
 346: }
 347: 
 348: /* md_gln: (Get login name)
 349:  *
 350:  * This routine returns the login name of the user.  This string is
 351:  * used mainly for identifying users in score files.
 352:  *
 353:  * A dummy string may be returned if you are unable to implement this
 354:  * function, but then the score file would only have one name in it.
 355:  */
 356: 
 357: char *
 358: md_gln()
 359: {
 360:     struct passwd *p, *getpwuid();
 361: 
 362:     if (!(p = getpwuid(getuid())))
 363:         return((char *)NULL);
 364:     return(p->pw_name);
 365: }
 366: 
 367: /* md_sleep:
 368:  *
 369:  * This routine causes the game to pause for the specified number of
 370:  * seconds.
 371:  *
 372:  * This routine is not particularly necessary at all.  It is used for
 373:  * delaying execution, which is useful to this program at some times.
 374:  */
 375: 
 376: md_sleep(nsecs)
 377: int nsecs;
 378: {
 379:     (void) sleep(nsecs);
 380: }
 381: 
 382: /* md_getenv()
 383:  *
 384:  * This routine gets certain values from the user's environment.  These
 385:  * values are strings, and each string is identified by a name.  The names
 386:  * of the values needed, and their use, is as follows:
 387:  *
 388:  *   TERMCAP
 389:  *     The name of the users's termcap file, NOT the termcap entries
 390:  *     themselves.  This is used ONLY if the program is compiled with
 391:  *     CURSES defined (-DCURSES).  Even in this case, the program need
 392:  *     not find a string for TERMCAP.  If it does not, it will use the
 393:  *     default termcap file as returned by md_gdtcf();
 394:  *   TERM
 395:  *     The name of the users's terminal.  This is used ONLY if the program
 396:  *     is compiled with CURSES defined (-DCURSES).  In this case, the string
 397:  *     value for TERM must be found, or the routines in curses.c cannot
 398:  *     function, and the program will quit.
 399:  *   ROGUEOPTS
 400:  *     A string containing the various game options.  This need not be
 401:  *     defined.
 402:  *   HOME
 403:  *     The user's home directory.  This is only used when the user specifies
 404:  *     '~' as the first character of a saved-game file.  This string need
 405:  *     not be defined.
 406:  *   SHELL
 407:  *     The user's favorite shell.  If not found, "/bin/sh" is assumed.
 408:  *
 409:  * If your system does not provide a means of searching for these values,
 410:  * you will have to do it yourself.  None of the values above really need
 411:  * to be defined except TERM when the program is compiled with CURSES
 412:  * defined.  In this case, as a bare minimum, you can check the 'name'
 413:  * parameter, and if it is "TERM" find the terminal name and return that,
 414:  * else return zero.  If the program is not compiled with CURSES, you can
 415:  * get by with simply always returning zero.  Returning zero indicates
 416:  * that their is no defined value for the given string.
 417:  */
 418: 
 419: char *
 420: md_getenv(name)
 421: char *name;
 422: {
 423:     char *value;
 424:     char *getenv();
 425: 
 426:     value = getenv(name);
 427: 
 428:     return(value);
 429: }
 430: 
 431: /* md_malloc()
 432:  *
 433:  * This routine allocates, and returns a pointer to, the specified number
 434:  * of bytes.  This routines absolutely MUST be implemented for your
 435:  * particular system or the program will not run at all.  Return zero
 436:  * when no more memory can be allocated.
 437:  */
 438: 
 439: char *
 440: md_malloc(n)
 441: int n;
 442: {
 443:     char *malloc();
 444:     char *t;
 445: 
 446:     t = malloc(n);
 447:     return(t);
 448: }
 449: 
 450: /* md_gseed() (Get Seed)
 451:  *
 452:  * This function returns a seed for the random number generator (RNG).  This
 453:  * seed causes the RNG to begin generating numbers at some point in it's
 454:  * sequence.  Without a random seed, the RNG will generate the same set
 455:  * of numbers, and every game will start out exactly the same way.  A good
 456:  * number to use is the process id, given by getpid() on most UNIX systems.
 457:  *
 458:  * You need to find some single random integer, such as:
 459:  *   process id.
 460:  *   current time (minutes + seconds) returned from md_gct(), if implemented.
 461:  *
 462:  * It will not help to return "get_rand()" or "rand()" or the return value of
 463:  * any pseudo-RNG.  If you don't have a random number, you can just return 1,
 464:  * but this means your games will ALWAYS start the same way, and will play
 465:  * exactly the same way given the same input.
 466:  */
 467: 
 468: md_gseed()
 469: {
 470:     return(getpid());
 471: }
 472: 
 473: /* md_exit():
 474:  *
 475:  * This function causes the program to discontinue execution and exit.
 476:  * This function must be implemented or the program will continue to
 477:  * hang when it should quit.
 478:  */
 479: 
 480: md_exit(status)
 481: int status;
 482: {
 483:     exit(status);
 484: }
 485: 
 486: /* md_lock():
 487:  *
 488:  * This function is intended to give the user exclusive access to the
 489:  * score file.  It does so by "creat"ing a lock file, which can only
 490:  * be created if it does not already exist.  The file is deleted when
 491:  * score file processing is finished.  The lock file should be located
 492:  * in the same directory as the score file.  These full path names should
 493:  * be defined for any particular site in rogue.h.  The constants SCORE_FILE
 494:  * and LOCK_FILE define these file names.
 495:  *
 496:  * When the parameter 'l' is non-zero (true), a lock is requested.  Otherwise
 497:  * the lock is released by removing the lock file.
 498:  */
 499: 
 500: md_lock(l)
 501: boolean l;
 502: {
 503:     short tries;
 504:     char *lock_file = LOCK_FILE;
 505: 
 506:     if (l) {
 507:         for (tries = 0; tries < 5; tries++) {
 508:             if (md_get_file_id(lock_file) == -1) {
 509:                 if (creat(lock_file, 0444) != -1) {
 510:                     break;
 511:                 } else {
 512:                     message("cannot lock score file", 0);
 513:                 }
 514:             } else {
 515:                 message("waiting to lock score file", 0);
 516:             }
 517:             sleep(2);
 518:         }
 519:     } else {
 520:         (void) unlink(lock_file);
 521:     }
 522: }
 523: 
 524: /* md_shell():
 525:  *
 526:  * This function spawns a shell for the user to use.  When this shell is
 527:  * terminated, the game continues.  Since this program may often be run
 528:  * setuid to gain access to privileged files, care is taken that the shell
 529:  * is run with the user's REAL user id, and not the effective user id.
 530:  * The effective user id is restored after the shell completes.
 531:  */
 532: 
 533: md_shell(shell)
 534: char *shell;
 535: {
 536:     long w[2];
 537: 
 538:     if (!fork()) {
 539:         int uid;
 540: 
 541:         uid = getuid();
 542:         setuid(uid);
 543:         execl(shell, shell, 0);
 544:     }
 545:     wait(w);
 546: }
 547: 
 548: /* If you have a viable curses/termlib library, then use it and don't bother
 549:  * implementing the routines below.  And don't compile with -DCURSES.
 550:  */
 551: 
 552: #ifdef CURSES
 553: 
 554: /* md_cbreak_no_echo_nonl:
 555:  *
 556:  * This routine sets up some terminal characteristics.  The tty-driver
 557:  * must be told to:
 558:  *   1.)  Not echo input.
 559:  *   2.)  Transmit input characters immediately upon typing. (cbreak mode)
 560:  *   3.)  Move the cursor down one line, without changing column, and
 561:  *        without generating a carriage-return, when it
 562:  *        sees a line-feed.  This is only necessary if line-feed is ever
 563:  *        used in the termcap 'do' (cursor down) entry, in which case,
 564:  *        your system should must have a way of accomplishing this.
 565:  *
 566:  * When the parameter 'on' is true, the terminal is set up as specified
 567:  * above.  When this parameter is false, the terminal is restored to the
 568:  * original state.
 569:  *
 570:  * Raw mode should not to be used.  Keyboard signals/events/interrupts should
 571:  * be sent, although they are not strictly necessary.  See notes in
 572:  * md_heed_signals().
 573:  *
 574:  * This function must be implemented for rogue to run properly if the
 575:  * program is compiled with CURSES defined to use the enclosed curses
 576:  * emulation package.  If you are not using this, then this routine is
 577:  * totally unnecessary.
 578:  *
 579:  * Notice that information is saved between calls.  This is used to
 580:  * restore the terminal to an initial saved state.
 581:  *
 582:  */
 583: 
 584: md_cbreak_no_echo_nonl(on)
 585: boolean on;
 586: {
 587: #ifdef UNIX_BSD4_2
 588:     static struct sgttyb tty_buf;
 589:     static int tsave_flags;
 590: 
 591:     if (on) {
 592:         ioctl(0, TIOCGETP, &tty_buf);
 593:         tsave_flags = tty_buf.sg_flags;
 594:         tty_buf.sg_flags |= CBREAK;
 595:         tty_buf.sg_flags &= ~(ECHO | CRMOD);    /* CRMOD: see note 3 above */
 596:         ioctl(0, TIOCSETP, &tty_buf);
 597:     } else {
 598:         tty_buf.sg_flags = tsave_flags;
 599:         ioctl(0, TIOCSETP, &tty_buf);
 600:     }
 601: #endif
 602: #ifdef UNIX_SYSV
 603:     struct termio tty_buf;
 604:     static struct termio tty_save;
 605: 
 606:     if (on) {
 607:         ioctl(0, TCGETA, &tty_buf);
 608:         tty_save = tty_buf;
 609:         tty_buf.c_lflag &= ~(ICANON | ECHO);
 610:         tty_buf.c_oflag &= ~ONLCR;
 611:         tty_buf.c_cc[4] = 1;  /* MIN */
 612:         tty_buf.c_cc[5] = 2;  /* TIME */
 613:         ioctl(0, TCSETAF, &tty_buf);
 614:     } else {
 615:         ioctl(0, TCSETAF, &tty_save);
 616:     }
 617: #endif
 618: }
 619: 
 620: /* md_gdtcf(): (Get Default Termcap File)
 621:  *
 622:  * This function is called ONLY when the program is compiled with CURSES
 623:  * defined.  If you use your system's curses/termlib library, this function
 624:  * won't be called.  On most UNIX systems, "/etc/termcap" suffices.
 625:  *
 626:  * If their is no such termcap file, then return 0, but in that case, you
 627:  * must have a TERMCAP file returned from md_getenv("TERMCAP").  The latter
 628:  * will override the value returned from md_gdtcf().  If the program is
 629:  * compiled with CURSES defined, and md_gdtcf() returns 0, and
 630:  * md_getenv("TERMCAP") returns 0, the program will have no terminal
 631:  * capability information and will quit.
 632:  */
 633: 
 634: char *
 635: md_gdtcf()
 636: {
 637:     return("/etc/termcap");
 638: }
 639: 
 640: /* md_tstp():
 641:  *
 642:  * This function puts the game to sleep and returns to the shell.  This
 643:  * only applies to UNIX 4.2 and 4.3.  For other systems, the routine should
 644:  * be provided as a do-nothing routine.  md_tstp() will only be referenced
 645:  * in the code when compiled with CURSES defined.
 646:  *
 647:  */
 648: 
 649: md_tstp()
 650: {
 651: #ifdef UNIX_BSD4_2
 652:     kill(0, SIGTSTP);
 653: #endif
 654: }
 655: 
 656: #endif
 657: 
 658: #endif

Defined functions

md_cbreak_no_echo_nonl defined in line 584; used 2 times
md_control_keybord defined in line 126; used 2 times
md_df defined in line 338; used 3 times
md_exit defined in line 480; used 1 times
md_gct defined in line 274; used 1 times
md_gdtcf defined in line 634; used 2 times
md_get_file_id defined in line 230; used 3 times
md_gfmt defined in line 307; used 1 times
md_gln defined in line 357; used 2 times
md_gseed defined in line 468; used 1 times
md_link_count defined in line 250; used 1 times
md_lock defined in line 500; used 3 times
md_shell defined in line 533; used 1 times
md_sleep defined in line 376; used 2 times
md_slurp defined in line 89; used 2 times
md_tstp defined in line 649; used 1 times

Defined variables

sccsid defined in line 14; never used
Last modified: 1987-11-26
Generated: 2016-12-26
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